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Can anyone help with this repair? Motor drives as soon as turned on (Solved: Very simple!)

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Has anyone experienced this symptom before, with a Taiyo R/C car, or other?
So I bought a Taiyo Super Fast from Japan (I collect all Taiyo RC) and it arrived with 4 of 8 batteries inside. One battery had leaked and corroded the terminals, and there was sticky black goop which appears to have leaked down onto the circuit board (haven't taken it apart, but it appears shiny through the hole). When turning the car on, it will immediately drive the wheels for 1-2 seconds slowly, then stop, without any transmitter input. After this nothing happens, no response, no red light.
Clearly something is broken, and I'm wondering if this symptom is something you've experienced before? Actually I vaguely recall experiencing this when I was a kid with my Jet Hopper, so it must mean a specific problem. Clearly I'll need to open and clean it, but hoping someone here has more info/suggestions.
You can see the issue in my video here (at 408 seconds)

I figured this out. I KNEW I'd seen it happen before, when I owned a Metro RC as a kid (Tyco in Australia). It happens simply because it's not getting enough power! It was getting about 3-4v from the 9.6v simply as one of the battery contacts was touching against some leftover corrosion (I'd already cleaned thoroughly, but this battery happened to touch the part I had trouble scrubbing off). As soon as I scrubbed that contact with a metal file, it fired up and works perfect!

Very happy with that...

 

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R/C Toy Memories

Sure glad the helpful members here helped ya out!  😴  (I would have but was VERY busy those 10 days.)

Pieced together a Runner HUTH in Red last year, like my 1st car, & to show its appreciation for all my hard work, it would not run after the build. 💩  Since I'm an EE-Lek-Tronical Genuis, I opened it up to the board & started wiggling stuff around:  I bent a small disc capacitor a tad & it runs fine to this day.  Electronics are the bane of the hobby to me, sure glad you got it sorted.  Gonna wath the video now.  Chris  REC

Quote from ibfragalot on April 25, 2022, 8:31 pm

I figured this out. I KNEW I'd seen it happen before, when I owned a Metro RC as a kid (Tyco in Australia). It happens simply because it's not getting enough power! It was getting about 3-4v from the 9.6v simply as one of the battery contacts was touching against some leftover corrosion (I'd already cleaned thoroughly, but this battery happened to touch the part I had trouble scrubbing off). As soon as I scrubbed that contact with a metal file, it fired up and works perfect!

Very happy with that...

 

I think you might have meant "Tyco in America" 🙂

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ibfragalot

Oh - just to add... nice video @ibfragalot   Always impressed at how people put together these slick videos, these days.

I think over the years, I might have restored 100+ models by Taiyo. I probably don't need to suggest this as I feel like you know what you're doing already...  but... a Dremel is super handy for cleaning out battery compartments properly. And in terms of getting controllers to work, in 99% of cases it's just the sliding contact points that need cleaning. Very easy with Taiyo. I could explain exactly how I do it, but you probably have a way....

Restoring transmitters on vintage RTR models is not quite so easy with Yonezawa, Atcomi and some other brands. But Taiyo is generally very forgiving.

Rob.

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ibfragalot

Yes, Tyco in America!

Thanks for the feedback and advice, I need all I can get! 🙂

After a while I figured that out with the controllers too (re: sliding contacts). I think the grease for the trigger decomposes after 30 years or so, gets all watery and spreads over the contacts. Thankfully cleaning it off with IPA works, as you say.

I'd love to have seen you restore some of those models. Maybe you can take some photos, and put up an article next time. Taiyo, Yonezawa, or Atcomi, no matter the brand, would be good.

Yeah totally - it's the grease alright! Taiyo grease goes green and acts more like an impediment to current, as it ages. Certainly around the 30 year mark.

Even for vintage models that work, I perform a basic service on every Taiyo transmitter when I get it. Here's my list:

  1. At any sign of rust or battery leak, Dremel the battery contact points in the battery compartment. I simply use Dremel abrasive buffs (511E) which are like soft, fibrous sponge attachments, made in Germany. The buffs will rub the plastic compartment itself, but I can live with this. The buffs will also disintegrate themselves, but that's what they're for.
  2. Now go inside the transmitter. First, wipe away all the excess grease from all the transmitter stick (or wheel) contact points.
  3. Use a damp cloth with a tiny bit of liquid soap, to further wipe/clean the contact points and surrounding area.
  4. Get a tiny corner of 1000 grit (or higher) sandpaper, and carefully use this to shine up (very lightly and carefully) each individual segment of each contact point. Do the same on both the sliding contacts, and the circuit board contacts. I use Tamiya Finishing Abrasive paper for this.
  5. Wipe away any lingering dust from the light sanding you have done, with the damp cloth. To ensure there is no lingering grit left behind.
  6. Now place a tiny amount of Tamiya Switch Lubricant to the contacts, to restore lubrication and prevent excessive wear in future. I have dozens of vintage tubes of this from the 1980s, but pretty sure you can still buy it.

At this point, you have a very fresh connection, with the highly conductive and high quality Tamiya lubricant also helping.

This whole job can be done in half an hour. The result should be pitch-perfect performance in terms of radio response, on the vehicle. I restored a Taiyo/Metro buggy this week that the seller said "wasn't working". The car performs absolutely minty, now.

It's so funny really. I've been doing this since I first started collecting in the 1990s. And as time passes, most consumers seem to have even less love and patience to try to fix old toys with a little TLC. And making the problem worse, newer products (China) are even less friendly toward being repaired, in a lot of cases.

But the older stuff made in Japan, Singapore, Korea, France, Italy, Germany, England, USA, and even Hong Kong... is such a joy to repair, if you have some sympathy for it. Whether it's a cassette player, a toy car, or even a book.

Funny story - my "R/C Toy Memories" hobby cave here, has a vintage 'National' brand mini bar fridge, that I have kept ever since my Dad bought it brand new in 1984. It is made in Japan. Still works perfectly. And could not be more appropriate for this room 😌 If it ever breaks down, I'll have a go at fixing it too.

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ibfragalot
Quote from R/C Toy Memories on May 12, 2022, 8:47 pm

I perform a basic service on every Taiyo transmitter when I get it. Here's my list

What a great rundown. This is information that needs to be shared with the community, so thank you.  I've found the same with many "not working" or "untested" models. It's the 30 year old batteries, contacts, or controller dirty, an easy fix.

Tamiya grease... that's something I need to get my hands on.

So true re: repairability. This is why I love WPL models. They're relatively cheap, but designed for DIY and repairability, with various grades of parts available from "will be quick, but will get you going" to "near indestructable". And most of all, great pose on the road (suspension, etc.) so fun to drive. WPL D-12 is worth getting, ~$50 bucks. You'll have to replace the driveshaft with a metal one eventually, but even out of the box 90% pre-built they're great.

 

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R/C Toy Memories

Yes, Thanks for the rundown!  This is what folks need to know- If they're game to try fixing something, this is just what they need, step-by-step.  Fixing requires experience, tools, patience, desire and an attention span, so no wonder more people ain't doing it.  Fine with me though, more cheap stuff to score for us.

About 10 years back I scored a Radio Shack Armatron since I missed the one I had as a kid.  They were a tad pricey (Then, I can't guess NOW) but I found one that was 99%- Good box, Zero wear, all the accessories & paperwork, for about 20% of what the others wanted as it was 'broken'.  1 wire soldered back on & Thanks for the sweet score Mate.  We've all done this many times, and yes, everything old is usually repairable and a joy to fix- IF you have the mindset.

I agree, most modern stuff is toss & replace since it's not designed to be fixed- A sign o' the times I guess.  Casio calculators that you can't open to replace the battery-Once open it never works again no matter how careful you are.  TV remotes that have no apparent parts that'd screw up but work intermittently for no reason.  This stuff drives me crazy, but it's not gonna get better, I know...

The WPL stuff is kinda the Tyco of today- Love their stuff.  Price, quality, wrenchability, performance, very similar, especially compared to what you'll find at Wal-Mart now.  Even those things have doubled to tripled in price the last 2 years, mine cost almost nothing well before Sars-CoV-2.  Gotta win that lotto mumblegripesnivel....Chris  REC

Armatron - yeah I always wanted one of those too 🙂

As for WPL - no offence intended whatsoever, but I’m afraid we’ll have to disagree on buying WPL I do agree that the models look decent and scale-like. But for ethical reasons, I personally refuse to buy any Chinese RC products. It may seem like a drastic stance, but I try to avoid Chinese products in all aspects of my life, actually.

You’d probably laugh if you saw my hobby collection 😄 I don’t even have a single Chinese 7.2v battery. Most of my stuff is vintage. Very, very little of it is Chinese.

As far as new release RC cars are concerned, the only brands I’ve bought in recent years are:

Tamiya - the only RC company left which still manufactures in Japan, though many cars are also made in Philippines (but none are made in China).

Kyosho - whose reissues of vintage classics are all made in Taiwan (also a democracy, and under great threat from China).

Essentially, I just refuse to send a single dollar of my hobby spending, to any country which is not a democracy.

Thankfully, it’s easy to avoid Russian RC cars, as they manufacture precisely zero 🙂

 

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ibfragalot
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